Architecture As Art
Tuesday, January 19, 2010 | Author: Mad Typist
I've often heard people scoff at the notion of blogging, as if it's still the advent of the internet and blogs are there merely as people's personal diaries made public. However, blogs have clearly evolved and everyone sort of brings their own motives to the table when it comes to putting down their thoughts on the internet for all to see.

I personally blog for two reasons. One, sometimes I just have a thought about something that I want to share, usually related to pop culture or football. Two, sometimes I find something out in the wilds of the internet that I want to share and bring to the attention of my readers, since they might otherwise miss out on something that might amuse them. This particular post is of the latter variety.

I wanted to share with you an amazing video that a friend directed me to. It's a gorgeous short film that meditates on architecture as art. The workmanship is quite remarkable - the subtle way that CGI effects are added in as the film progresses, the sharp eye applied to the editing of the film, and the score composed to complement the action. In addition, I really liked the way the filmmaker starts the film as an invisible presence, and then slowly becomes more prominent as the film goes along.

I highly recommend you watch the film in fullscreen mode with your sound turned up. Enjoy.
Here's the link to the Vimeo site where you can see it in HD mode (recommended).
The Third & The Seventh by Alex Roman.

However, if you can't be bothered to click over, I've embedded the non-HD video here as well:

The Third & The Seventh from Alex Roman on Vimeo.

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1 comments:

On 7:50 PM , Brownie said...

I actually came across this video as well. It's totally amazing... I didn't believe it was only CG until I saw the making of clips.